Life in color

Color kaleidoscope

Purple Color shades

Life in color. Purple Color shades

Life in color. Purple Color shades

Purple Color shades
A dark color, the closest in value to black, some of its symbolic meaning stems from the fact that purple reflects so little light. However, Purple’s complement, yellow, is the palest of the color wheel hues and the color that reflects the most light. Thus, the two together form something like sunlight and shadow (or perhaps, in emotional terms, joy and sadness). Meanwhile, Purple as a color associated with deep feeling, as in “purple passion” or “purple with rage.” In addition, it is the color of mourning for the death of loved ones.
In early cultures, purple dye was extremely difficult and expensive to produce. Therefore, “royal purple” quickly came to symbolize the ruling class, dignity, and power. That’s why purple clothing was forbidden to those of lower rank.

Landscape of French province. Purple Color shades

Landscape of French province. Purple Color shades

Meanwhile, in painting and in writing, a “purple patch” is a section that is overwrought and even lurid, but fondly clung to by the painter or writer. Also, Purple connotes bravery, perhaps an extension of its connection with royalty, as with the “Purple Heart” — a heart-shaped purple-and-gold military medal on a purple ribbon signifying injury in battle.

In fact, Purple and violet are similar, though purple is closer to red. In optics, there is an important difference; purple is a composite color made by combining red and blue, while violet is a spectral color, with its own wavelength on the visible spectrum of light.

The majority of Russian-speaking people defines purple as a shade of red color. Some scholars may argue, saying purple – green. A word «purple» means the lilac, violet color in its different versions, including pink and crimson.

Called in ancient times Divine Purple, it dates back to the Phoenician civilization. It was there, on the eastern coast of the Mediterranean Sea, people opened this natural dye. It highlights the special gland located in the mantle cavity of mollusks from the family of red algae. In purple dyed cloth in ancient times, and in the course of a very long process at different stages material acquired at first yellow, then green, blue, and in the end – the red-purple color. But the final, which the ancient painters sought, was a red-violet, and it looked as robes of royalty. This color, no accident, meant wealth. Only the most wealthy people could wear a purple garment: for one gram of paint needed to collect and process ten thousand clams!

The supreme power of ancient Rome, wishing to preserve their privilege to purple, tried to regulate the use of purple cloth with special laws against the luxury dresses. Thus, according to the decree of Nero, to wear purple could only emperor, and no private individuals. However, with the decline of Rome, the use of purple reduced, and even stopped after the fall of Constantinople in 1453.

To replace extracted from shellfish purple became possible and much cheaper due to vegetable-based dyes. Pope Paul II in 1464 ordered to use for the manufacture of luxury “the cardinal purple” dye dried insect Kermes (cochineal relatives). Science deprived purple of the royalty aura. But with the invention of William Perkin purple cloth became available to the masses. In particular, in 1856, the English chemist got the synthetic dye magenta based on Aniline – mauveine – and soon organized its industrial production.

Purple Color shades